Throwdown with Disc Golf

Throwdown with Disc Golf

Tee off in five minutes! Are you ready? What? You’ve never played disc golf before? No problem, all you need is a set of discs and a good attitude. Here are the rules on how to play and how to be a force to be reckoned with on the green. This is a great social sport that allows for imagination and improvisation. There are plenty of ways to throw a disc but it takes some skill to end up with the best score.

Since it is also referred to as Frisbee golf, you may have guessed that it’s a combination of Frisbee and golf; there is some truth to that. A group tees off by throwing their discs toward the basket with the purpose of making it in with the fewest number of throws.

Scores are determined by how many throws each player has to make it in the basket. When your disc lands on the course, place a marker where you must throw from behind on your next turn. This is called marking the lie. The person with the fewest throws total throws first at the following tee pad, followed by the next best score and so on. New courses have increasingly challenging designs that have far more than a green field with some trees in the way.

The three main types of discs are putters, mid-range and drivers. Each disc is used from a certain distance to the basket. Starting each hole at the tee pad, each player makes their first throw with a driver to get the best distance possible. Once the basket is in sight, throw with the mid-range and use the putter for shorter throws so the disc is more likely to float into the basket.

Different throws include backhand and forehand.

Now that you know the basics, want to take your game to the next level? Pro Tip: don’t be afraid to experiment. This is a game with a very casual goal – reach the target. Plan on trying all sorts of attempts and find what works best for you and don’t be afraid to miss.

The fun of this game is trying to maintain a balance of precision while developing a style that is the most efficient, but of course getting there means room for error. Once you start playing with a developed style, move on to another course where you start the whole process over again. It makes for a casual experience while still maintaining an air of competition and creativity.

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